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Welcome to The Complicated Pregnancy

Pregnancy is one of the most amazing experiences you can have, but there is an ugly side of it no one really talks about.  The real details of what happens when you have a complicated pregnancy. These days doctors are often too busy to offer the personalized care needed for pregnancies that become complicated. Test results get missed, call backs or emergency appointments don't happen in time, diagnoses come too late and so on.  Or they simply don't want to offer up an honest prognosis due to fear of legal ramifications. We ourselves are often silent when it comes to talking about a complicated pregnancy we've experienced. 

Most pregnancies move along without any problems. Still, approximately 8 percent of pregnancies become complicated and if left untreated, could become harmful for you and your baby. Some complications are due to health issues that existed before becoming pregnant, and others happen unexpectedly during pregnancy and are unavoidable.

We’re here to hopefully make it a little less scary by arming you with the information you need to get through. Knowledge is power and it could save yours and/or your baby's life. This site is a place for you to be part of a supportive community and to find the resources needed to fill in the gaps and help you take an informed, active role in your pregnancy. 

My Story 

I am a survivor of a complicated pregnancy and traumatic birth experience. After an emergency c-section due to severe preeclampsia, followed by a significant post-partum hemorrhage, I was admitted to the ICU in critical condition.

 

After 7 years of trying to get pregnant, countless fertility treatments and 4 rounds of IVF I couldn’t believe this was how the birth of our long awaited, dreamed of and wished for child was going down. Me in the ICU and our beautiful newborn baby girl in the NICU. After a devastatingly brief embrace following her birth, we would not see each other again for 4 days. It was so heartbreaking and frightening. 

 

What set this traumatic birthing experience in motion? I had been admitted to the hospital several days before with preeclampsia and to receive steroid shots to help my daughters' lungs develop faster should I have to deliver early. Three days later, my blood pressure hit 224/110 and my daughter's heart rate began to drop. It all came on so quickly. The baby was coming out NOW, and at 32w4d. Within 30 minutes I was having an emergency c-section. THEN after what was described to me as a textbook delivery (given the circumstances), my pressure began to drop while my husband and I happily waited in recovery thinking the worst was over. He glanced up and saw my blood pressure had dropped to 50/30 on the monitor and ran to get a nurse. I was slowly hemorrhaging, and they didn’t know why and couldn’t stop it. I went in for a second surgery and as they put me back under, I prayed I would wake up again. It was the scariest moment of my life. In the end, I will have lost almost half of the blood in my body due to an acute, very rare case of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation or DIC (because having severe preeclampsia wasn't bad enough). As my doctor put it, I had a rare complication on top of a rare complication. I almost died. Literally almost died. It's pretty sobering when your doctor looks you in the eyes and tells you YOU almost died. Talk about a surreal moment. One that took me a long time to fully process and honestly, am still processing to this day. 

 

We were lucky enough to get through it and are thankfully all healthy and doing great. Add this to having had full placenta previa and a substantial mid-pregnancy bleed at 3am where I thought we had lost our baby.  A wild and traumatic experience all around. But one I'd go through again ten times over because it gave my husband and I the best thing that ever happened to us, our beautiful daughter.

 

The Complicated Pregnancy is a place we can all learn and share information. Our shared experiences will hopefully help protect ourselves and our babies through learning to become the strongest self-advocates we can be for our care. The un-sugar-coated truth not meant to scare anyone but help prepare you for what could happen.  I wish I was better prepared and better understood the potential risks and impacts, because it's true.... you never think it will happen to you. I certainly didn't.

 

Welcome to our sisterhood of trauma and triumph.

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